No, not the Brits!  Parents Of Missionaries.  A couple of times recently we’ve considered the POMs in the context of the challenge of caring for them from a distance as they age, but that was strictly from the mission worker’s perspective.  What does overseas mission look like from a POM’s perspective?

Parents generally acknowledge, albeit sometimes reluctantly, that their little darlings will one day grow up, move away, and see less of them.  But at least they hope to visit regularly, and see each other for family celebrations like Christmas and birthdays.  They hope to play an active part in raising any grandchildren, and enjoy lots of hugs when they meet.

But when the little darlings become mission workers and move to the other side of the planet there can be a huge sense of loss occasioned by the separation.  Yet POMs know they are supposed to feel pride that their offspring has found her vocation and followed her calling, which only means they find it harder to openly acknowledge their grief.  Add to that the guilt POMs can feel because they’re not absolutely delighted.  Also they can’t truly express their feelings to their children for fear of discouraging them, and POMs can very easily succumb to psychological damage.

OK, the children aren’t actually dead, but in practical terms the loss when a child emigrates is not dissimilar to bereavement, and needs to be grieved in the same way or else unresolved grief can eat away at a POM’s wellbeing

So if you are a POM, how can you  cope with this situation?

  • Recognise the issue and get support.  Talk to a pastor, or a counsellor.  Make an effort to meet up with other POMs because they have been through the same thing and will stand more chance of understanding the challenge you face.
  • Try to see your loss as a sacrifice for the Lord.  After all, you probably dedicated your children to God when they were young, so now he is taking you at your word and taking what you have already offered him.  They’re not yours, they’re Gods.  In the Bible Hannah did this (1 Samuel 2:18-19) and rejoiced, even though she only saw her son once a year.
  • Make the most of your time with them.  When they’re back on home assignment they may well be tired, overworked, frantically visiting supporters, and may even be living with you in a house that is too small for you all, so don’t go for quantity of time, but quality.  Try to have one week’s holiday with them when there are no other distractions, and be happy with that.
  • Ask their agency to connect you with other POMs for a mutual support network, and if there isn’t one, why not start one?
  • Recognise you’re part of their ministry.  You have spent much of your life nurturing your kids to become the people that God wants them to be, so don’t stop now that God is using them overseas.
  • Check out online resources like the National Network of Parents of Missionaries (in the USA) and tips helpfully provided by Diane Stortz.  Start a similar network in your own country if you can’t find one
  • Read Savageau and Stortz’s book for Parents of Missionaries

 

It is entirely natural for humans to want to be close to our loved ones, the ones we’ve nurtured and cherished for so many years.  But it’s entirely normal for the family of God to be about our Father’s business, wherever that may take us.  Letting our children go abroad may be the toughest thing God ever asks of us, but as Jesus said:

Whoever loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me

(Matthew 10:37)